How to Use E-Commerce Video Marketing to Drive Sales

How to Use E-Commerce Video Marketing to Drive Sales

When customers shop online, they take extra steps to ensure the products they’re browsing are what they really want. Because they can’t see the product up close or hold it in their hand, they require reassurance and detailed information that tells them they’re ready to make a purchase.

So, why not use video marketing to move them through the sales funnel? Video content provides opportunities to give customers a better look at your products so they’re comfortable during the checkout process. 

Engaging customers with video marketing

If you want to increase e-commerce sales, you need to give the people what they want. In this case, it’s video. Around 40% of people say they want to see more video content from marketers, and with good reason. It’s an easy, fun way to interact with brands and gather more information about their products and services. It also breaks the monotony of text, images and other content that isn’t as engaging.

In general, people react more positively to video than other mediums. The demand for video has increased so much that marketers feel they have no choice but to make it the centerpiece of their content marketing strategies. About 45% of marketers plan to use YouTube as a content distribution channel in the near future, while 41% plan to use Facebook video content.

We’re going to go over the different ways you can use ecommerce video marketing to generate more sales, including:

Let’s get started.

1. Optimize video for mobile devices

You need to appeal to those in your audience who view your content on their smartphones and other non-desktop devices. If not, you’re neglecting more than 50 percent of people who view video content. If someone uses their mobile device or tablet to browse your website but can’t properly view your videos,

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Should Your Small Business Rent a Coworking Space?

Should Your Small Business Rent a Coworking Space?

Many startup owners are hard at work trying to find an affordable workspace for themselves and their employees, but that’s easier said than done these days. Partly because the real estate market is so crowded in major metropolitan areas, more and more startup owners have been resorting to coworking arrangements or sharing an office space with workers from another company who help split the bill.

More often than not, coworking makes sense for startups, but only if those in charge are familiar with the arrangement and know how to make the best of it. When does coworking make sense for your startup? Here’s what you need to know about making the move into a shared working space.

Working from home isn’t always the answer

Many startups begin in the home, which is only natural given that most have relatively little cash to spare on expensive offices. Just because you’re crunched for cash doesn’t mean you have to put up with squalid working conditions, however. When working from home isn’t the answer, a coworking arrangement may be an alternative way to establish your business without breaking the bank. There are also many benefits to a coworking space that you can take advantage of outside of shared rent; shared internet services, electricity, and 24-hour access, for instance, can go a long way towards supercharging your startup’s initial foraying into the market.

The average costs associated with coworking arrangements are routinely lower than those associated with traditional business offices. This should come as little surprise, as sharing your space necessarily means that it’s not as valuable as it once was before. Don’t fret about your startup going stagnant because of an inability to work in shared conditions, however; many of those who rely on coworking arrangements were initially opposed to the setup but

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How Progressive Web Apps Are Changing Businesses

How Progressive Web Apps Are Changing Businesses

For some time now, Google has been emphasizing the importance of responsive websites. According to Statista, 48.9% of all website traffic comes from smartphones alone, and that number is expected to grow as developing nations get online using affordable and accessible smartphones, and as more people ditch desktop computers and laptops in favor of the convenience their tablets and smartphones offer. 

Back in 2015, Google announced that it would start to favor responsive sites, and we’ve certainly seen search results reflect this preference, and will continue to do so. Not only did it put new measures in place for monitoring and tracking the optimization of sites, but it also provided site owners with the necessary tools to do so as well.

But technology progresses quickly, and now there is a new way to engage with your website visitors in a more effective and engaging way, which is through the use of progressive web apps. 

Editor’s note: Looking for the right mobile app development solution for your business? Fill out the below questionnaire to have our vendor partners contact you about your needs.

 

What are progressive web apps?

Take the best aspects of a native mobile app and a minimalist responsive website, and you’ve got a progressive web app (PWA). 

First announced by Google four years ago, the format has already been adopted by many big brands, including Twitter, Forbes and Housing.com. However, thanks to the maturity of the tech required for their creation, PWAs are now becoming accessible to all, including small businesses – even those who could not have afforded to have their own app developed from scratch, which is a big part of their appeal. 

As a format, PWA is designed to offer a perfect user experience; they are as reliable as a website (no apps crashing

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How to Overcome Procrastination at Work

How to Overcome Procrastination at Work

We have all procrastinated. We set a goal to accomplish a task, only to become distracted on something less important. It’s easy to put off the thing we don’t want to do for the thing that really doesn’t need to be done. Before we know it, we are rushing like crazy to meet a deadline, or even worse, we miss it entirely.

Do you ever consider how much time you spend procrastinating? It’s typically longer than the actual work would take. We delay the inevitable because it feels like too much work, or we feel a sense of dread in doing it. Imagine what we could accomplish with the time and brain space freed up after accomplishing a task instead of hunting for every excuse not to do it.

Procrastination, or the art of perpetual delaying, comes from a Latin verb procrastinare defined as “to put off until tomorrow.” But this goes beyond our choice to delay efforts. The word is also derived from an ancient Greek word akrasia which means “doing something against our better judgment.”

Procrastination is the one thing that differentiates people with influence from those who don’t have it. Influential people do the work. They show up every day, without excuses, ready to put forth the effort to get a job done, improve their skills or rise to the next level. They bring a positive attitude to each day and see opportunity in everything. Procrastinators, on the other hand, put off the work required to accomplish tasks. They are perceived to lack self-awareness or motivation. Many think procrastinators are lazy and poor time managers. In reality, procrastinators live in a state of negativity: They dread work and putting forth effort. As a result, they lack the influence they need to get a promotion, land a new

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How to Increase Employee Productivity

How to Increase Employee Productivity

People usually have a dedicated workspace or office because they find they work much more efficiently without the distractions of home. In some circumstances, it also allows for a better work/life balance, as the home is for family life and downtime, whereas the office is purely a place for work. Working from home can often blur these lines.

Office spaces can – and ideally should – be crafted to improve the productivity of each individual employee, by designing the workplace better. An article in Inc. mentions that practical office design solutions tend to help workers focus more.

However, functional design is only one-half of the equation. Businesses also need to include a methodology for helping workers find mental peace. The modern world is increasingly hectic, and workers that have their minds focused on other things can’t function at peak performance levels. Companies can incorporate several things, both in their design, and to promote positive office culture, to help their employees enjoy their jobs. Here we explore some of the measures that businesses can put in place to help their employees be more productive.

Build off the company’s mission

A mission statement, as Shopify informs us, is a pure expression of a company’s existence. The business’s purpose, however, doesn’t always translate well to the employee’s goal of doing his or her job. By incorporating the company’s mission into the everyday workings of an office, a business can promote its reason for existing alongside what it needs from its hires. Harvard Business Review notes that when employees have a sense of purpose, they are usually far more productive. Individual goals tend to allow for more self-motivation in getting work done.

Incorporate individual and collective achievements

Employees are individuals, but most companies seem to overlook this fact. As a business grows,

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